Category Archives: Princess Tutu

“Those who accept their fate find happiness; those who defy it, glory.”

Warning: the following TV show contains ballet, romance, magic, fluffy girly cuteness,  and obnoxiously huge anime eyes. Take a look at these two trailers to see if you can tolerate the content. If you still love Disney movies and/or have been interested in that weird pony thing that’s been going around the internet, you should be fine.

Princess Tutu

Synopsis: Once upon a time, there was a duck who fell in love with a prince. The prince, Mytho, was empty inside, for he had sacrificed his heart to seal away an evil raven. When the duck wished that she could help return the prince’s heart to him, an old man appeared and gave the duck a magic pendant that could turn her into a girl. The girl, named Duck, now searches for the missing shards of the prince’s heart in a town that merges fairy tales and reality. Coming close to a heart shard transforms her into the beautiful and graceful Princess Tutu, who wins over her opponents through her magical dance. However, complications arise– who is this other princess, Rue, who is vying for Mytho’s affection? And why does Mytho’s guardian, Fakir, not want his heart to be returned?

Review: One thing I love about fantasy is how it can so easily transcend the limits of its genre. It gives the opportunity for the story to be played out in new and fascinating ways, and questions the nature of fiction and reality. 

So why am I bringing this up in a kid’s show about a magical girl ballerina fairytale princess?

You may have found the above synopsis somewhat confusing. That’s because Princess Tutu is a fairytale– inspired by Grimm’s Fairy Tales, good old Walt Disney, and quite a bit of classical balletmost obviously and importantly Swan Lake. It’s also a metafictional fairytale, which means all of the characters know they’re in a story and try to fit their roles to the best of their ability. Or should they defy the limitations of their fictional world and just be themselves?

…Right, let’s back up a little bit here.  Moving to the technical side, Tutu manages to take a fairly small budget and really make something out of it. The character designs are extremely shojo and stylized, but pretty and clean. Backgrounds are detailed and varied, and the use of color to set the mood is fantastic. The action/dancing scenes aren’t perfectly animated, but are gorgeously choreographed and look amazing, making that a forgivable offense. Unlike most magical girl shows, there isn’t a huge amount of stock footage, and Princess Tutu’s transformation sequence is only a few seconds long, when its predecessors could have transformations lasting more than a minute.

That's the prince on the left. He isn't a girl. Really.

Tutu uses famous classical and ballet tunes, making its soundtrack one of the show’s best features.  This is the perfect venue to expose people to classical music– I’m currently listening to “Waltz of the Flowers” from The Nutcracker on repeat. As for voice acting, I have not seen the original Japanese version,  but can safely say that the English voice cast is just fantastic. The standout performance belongs to Luci Christian as Duck/Tutu, who makes Duck endearing without being obnoxious, and gives Tutu a heartfelt, serene grace.

Back to the actual content… Okay, I’ll admit that I was reluctant at first to start watching this. And, well… you can sort of see why. I mean, I like shojo, but… Princess Tutu. Princess. Tutu. I have my limits.

But, well, it looked cute and harmless and I’d been told by quite a few people to watch it, even those not normally into magical girl shows. The first half is pretty standard monster-of-the-week, finding the prince’s lost heart shards/dodging romantic complications, etc., but I kept watching because I felt like I’d touched on something special. Something was building beneath the surface. The story, set in motion, began to slowly grind forward once again.

And then…

Princess Tutu is not quite a deconstruction of fairy tales and the magical girl genre– it’s too gentle for that. However, it does take a good long look at the nature of archetypal roles, and of the power of story and words. Fate vs. free will is a strong recurring theme throughout. Who is Princess Tutu, exactly? Is she truly the one fated to be by the Prince’s side forever? Or in the end, is she only just a duck?

Tutu is not afraid to get into darker, more complex (still suitable for children, but more PG-rated) themes and scenarios in its second half, and proves to be a worthy successor to all those Disney movies that terrified us as kids. It’s also exceedingly well-written, with some fantastic characters. I loved the main cast (Duck, Mytho, Fakir and Rue), their stories, and their struggles with the roles assigned to them. The supporting cast and even the one-shot characters are interesting and enjoyable as well.

My main problem with Tutu is that the buildup is just too long– 12 out of 26 episodes– and it could easily make someone lose interest before the good stuff starts happening. Otherwise, can you tell already that I love this show? Because I love this show. I would happily write out 1000 more words praising it if that meant more people would watch it. I love how people spent so much effort to create a beautiful, intelligent, well-written story for children, that just about anyone can watch. I love a good fantasy that delights in its genre and pushes its limitations.

Princess Tutu is an exquisite show, and I normally reserve that adjective for things currently in museums. It’s not perfect– no shows are– but it’s still one of my favorite anime series, and something I would recommend to anyone.

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Convinced? Want to watch Princess Tutu? Well, you can watch it legally on Youtube (here, you may need a Youtube account) (looks like they took it off) and Hulu (here) in English, free of charge. It’s only 26 episodes, so what are you waiting for?

Next time I try to talk about fantasy science, using Tales of the Abyss as the main example. Why? Because I like it. Also because it makes no sense.

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Filed under animation, anime, fantasy talk, Princess Tutu, review