So I’m a girl who likes fantasy.

It’s more common than you’d think, actually. And I’m not just talking about Twilight fans.

The fact that there are female fantasy fans–and authors– is not new. Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonflight came out in 1968 with a female protagonist, so they’ve been around for quite a while. And as for modern authors, one only need look at J.K. Rowling, the world’s first billionaire author, who moved her fantasy epic into mainstream consciousness.

But the Dragonriders of Pern series is for adults, and Harry Potter is, well, not a female protagonist. At eleven, I was all into high fantasy, especially Tolkien. I loved The Hobbit– still do, in fact– but you can’t help but notice the distinct lack of women in that book. I also thought Eowyn was basically the best thing ever with her horses and swords and death charges, and I wanted to see more of her, but the Two Towers movie hadn’t come out yet, so nothing doing.

And then one day, I found Tamora Pierce.

This is a cover from one of her earlier books:

Awesome? Or REALLY AWESOME???????

For you people out there going, “Huh?”, Tamora Pierce is a young adult fantasy writer who typically has female protagonists and medieval high fantasy settings, with lots of worldbuilding and politics thrown into the mix. She has two main worlds: the Tortall universe, which focuses more on knights and heroic adventures, and the Circle universe, which focuses more on magic and mages. Her Song of the Lioness series is the first set in Tortall, and stars a girl named Alanna (see above),  who disguises herself as a boy in order to become a knight. Really awesome adventures ensue.

I was probably a bit young to be reading those books, especially the later ones, but it was the library’s fault for putting them in the children’s section. And I’m really glad they did, because Alanna was my model for fantasy women– she basically set the standards for how far I would tolerate badly written female characters in my fantasy media.

Alanna was  a well-rounded character who didn’t abide by common stereotypes of women, she was just as capable as her fellow male knights, and she was completely independent, never existing solely as a love interest. She eventually did get married and start a family, but she was the one who went to war, not her husband.

I also love the variety of Pierce’s heroines; she never writes the same character over and over. Alanna’s daughter Aly is very different from her mother and finds her talent in places other than fighting, while Kel, the first woman to train openly for knighthood, sometimes resents that everyone is constantly comparing her to Alanna. Not all of them are action girls, either, as the nonviolent and  feminine Sandry from the Circle Universe can attest, but Sandry is still a perfectly capable person and can get rid of anything that threatens her or her friends.

They also all look very different, and none of them are ‘traditionally’ beautiful, just like there are a large variety of appearances for male characters. I would love to see more of this in general fantasy (and everything else, really)– women judged  not by their appearance, but their abilities.

I loved these books as a teenager, and I still read through them every so often. I would recommend them to anyone, not just girls, who loves good fantasy and YA fiction.

————————————————–

…Well, that wasn’t much of a rant, was it? I have to learn to stay on topic here.

I suppose my real point for this post is that I want to see female characters like that as the rule, not the exception. It has gotten much better since Pierce started publishing Alanna books back in the 80’s, but there’s still a long way to go.

I was going to use other examples of fantasy women and see if they  matched up to Pierce’s heroines at all, but most examples flying through my head were that of video game women. I could make a whole series of posts about the video game industry’s treatment of women, but thankfully, it’s already been done for me.

Enjoy. Or not.

Next time: I talk about an old animated movie for kids… or is it?

Childhood nightmares returning...


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Filed under fantasy talk, literature, Tamora Pierce, video games, women in fantasy

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